Posts Tagged ‘colony’

‘Mining the Sky’ – John S. Lewis

March 22, 2013

This is the last of my seven posts about good textbooks or technical books about Earth impactors in English. Let me know about works I’ve overlooked!

Mining the Sky by Dr. John S. Lewis has 15 chapters about utilizing space resources. This is, in effect, a distillation of the OOP (Out-of-Print) 1993 Arizona Space Science Series textbook, “Resources of Near-Earth Space,” edited by Dr. Lewis, Mildred S. Mathews, and Mary L. Guerrieri.

Dr. Lewis became the Chief Scientist at one of the asteroid mining companies, Deep Space Industries (DSI) in 2013 after helping to define the industry two decades earlier with ‘Resources.’

275 pages, Helix Books, 1996, Mining the Sky by Dr. John S. Lewis, Paperback, U$13.64 from Amazon.

Errata: page 172, replace ‘William Burroughs’ with ‘Anthony Burgess’ as author of the nadsat language in ‘A Clockwork Orange.’

Resources of Near-Earth Space – John S. Lewis

March 17, 2013

Resources of Near-Earth Space edited by John S. Lewis, Mildred S. Mathews, and Mary L. Guerrieri.

The essential textbook of Space Resources, with 33 papers defining the field to the public. I hope Dr Lewis has colleagues working on the update/sequel now that two decades more data have been accumulated. Dr. Lewis joined Deep Space Industries in Feb. 2013.

  1. Introduction – 1 paper, Using Resources From Near-Earth Space by Lewis, McKay, and Clark
  2. The Moon – 15 papers including Refractory Material From Lunar Resources by Poisl and Carrier
  3. Near-Earth Objects – 7 papers including Volatile Products From Carbonaceous Asteroids by Nichols
  4. Mars and Beyond – 10 papers including A Chemical Approach to Carbon Dioxide Utilization on Mars by Hepp, Landis, and Kubiak

Arizona Space Science Series textbook, University of Arizona Press, 977 pages, 1993, Resources of Near-Earth Space is OOP (Out-Of-Print), but if you act fast, used copies are as low as U$112 at Amazon and U$119 on eBay. Very inexpensive if you want to make a good impression at your Deep Space Industries job interview by quoting from their Chief Scientist’s textbook during your answer to their question: what do you want to work on.¬† ūüôā

One in 300 by J.T. McIntosh

January 21, 2008

This installment of “memorable” has two phrases, actually.¬† Both are from the same tale of doomsday.

one-in-300.jpg

[cover by Ed Valigursky, Ace Books, 1955]

Our sun’s solar output will go up a couple percent soon – time to move!¬† But how?¬† Have the great manufacturing centers build lifeships.¬† One pilot, ten passengers, and enough ships for every “one in three hundred” of Earth’s population to try to fly to Mars.¬† Madness!¬† But it helped some of the world to deal with doomsday…¬† Here’s McIntosh’s opening:

“I ignored the half-human thing that ran at my heels like a dog, crying, “Please! Please! Please!”¬† …¬† I was twenty-eight, Lt. Bill Easson, and a more unremarkable young man¬†it would have been difficult¬†to find.¬† but now through no fault of my own, I was a god.”¬† Lt Easson is in Simsville, pop. 3261, to secretly pick in 3 weeks the ten people he would try to fly to Mars.¬† “Lt. Bill Easson, god!”

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Galactic Center series – Gregory Benford

January 8, 2008

I’ve discussed In the Ocean of Night, because of a memorable scene in one of the original stories, and referred to the fact that it became the first of the Galactic Center series and future history 7 years later with the publication of Across the Sea of Suns in 1984.¬† Then, across the next¬†10 years, Benford detoured from Nigel Walmsley’s interstellar travels to jump a hundred thousand years into the future near the Galactic Center, not too far from the Eater embedded in the galaxy’s core.¬† Telling of the remnants of desiccated Snowglade’s Bishop clan, endlessly running the deserts, avoiding the latest mech attempts to kill them, legs pistoning in a¬†150 kilometer an hour stride, Killeen and his father trying to watch over his son Toby, Benford spun out a trilogy about their own interstellar wanderings.

Finally, in the sixth and culminating volume,¬† Sailing Bright Eternity, in 1995, he picks up Nigel’s story, pointed to in a indirect reference in¬†one of the Killeen trilogy,¬†to the Taj Majal replica he built after arriving in the Center.¬† Both sets of characters intersect as the mechs¬†try to keep the galaxy clean of organics, Naughts being of no use to Ones.¬† The fabric of normal Space-Time twists into multidimensional¬†esty layers¬†at the edge of the core’s black hole as the characters plunge into strangeness and possible safety.

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